Thursday, March 16, 2017

Preaching This Sunday in Zellwood, Florida

For those of you who live in the Orlando area, I will be preaching at Rolling Hills Community Church in Zellwood this Sunday, March 19th at the 9:30am service.  I hope you will come by and say hello!
(these photos were taken this past Monday afternoon as I baptized my youngest grandbaby, Cienna Estelle Sinclair.  Notice the rock that has the Alpha and the Omega sign.....we did not do that!  Of course God is the "Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end")



  video


#RobertSchullerMinisries, #AChurchWithNoWalls, #Babybaptism, #Grandchldren, #Love,

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Great Things For 2017!



U.S. Senate Chaplain Barry Black delivered a powerful message of hope at The National Prayer Breakfast 2017.   


"Through him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God. More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us."   Romans 5:2-5

Highlighted below is an article by Nick Kristof.   It was too political for this pastor (me) but after a bit of editing I think it is one of the most encouraging articles I have read.   I believe we need to be aware that all of our efforts, and the efforts of all the charities and churches of the world, have made great progress in mitigating the effects of world hunger, climate change, and extreme poverty.  According to Nick, the world is becoming a better place. Thank God, who cares about every one of us!


Why 2017 May Be the Best Year Ever
By: Nick Kristof
New York Times, Jan 22, 2017, pg SR13 
There’s a broad consensus that the world is falling apart, with every headline reminding us that life is getting worse.
Except that it isn’t. In fact, by some important metrics, 2016 was the best year in the history of humanity. And 2017 will probably be better still.
How can this be?
Here, take my quiz:
On any given day, the number of people worldwide living in extreme poverty:
A.) Rises by 5,000, because of climate change, food shortages and endemic corruption.
B.) Stays about the same.
C.) Drops by 250,000.
Polls show that about 9 out of 10 Americans believe that global poverty has worsened or stayed the same. But in fact, the correct answer is C. Every day, an average of about a quarter-million people worldwide graduate from extreme poverty, according to World Bank figures.
In the early 1980s, more than 40 percent of all humans were living in extreme poverty. Now fewer than 10 percent are. By 2030 it looks as if just 3 or 4 percent will be. (Extreme poverty is defined as less than $1.90 per person per day, adjusted for inflation.)
For nearly all of human history, extreme poverty has been the default condition of our species, and now, on our watch, we are pretty much wiping it out. That’s a stunning transformation that I believe is the most important thing happening in the world today.
There will, of course, be continued poverty of a less extreme kind, smaller numbers of children will continue to die unnecessarily, and inequality remains immense. Oxfam calculated this month that just eight rich men own as much wealth as the poorest half of humanity. Yet global income inequality is actually declining. While income inequality has increased within the U.S., it has declined on a global level because China and India have lifted hundreds of millions from poverty.
On a recent trip to Madagascar to report on climate change, I was struck that several mothers I interviewed had never heard of Trump, or of Barack Obama, or even of the United States. Their obsession was more desperate: keeping their children alive. And the astonishing thing was that those children, despite severe malnutrition, were all alive, because of improvements in aid and health care — reflecting trends that are grander than any one man.
Some of the most remarkable progress has been over diseases that — thank God! — Americans very rarely encounter. Elephantiasis is a horrible, disfiguring, humiliating disease usually caused by a parasite, leading a person’s legs to expand hugely until they resemble an elephant’s. Yet some 40 countries are now on track to eliminate elephantiasis. When you’ve seen the anguish caused by elephantiasis — or leprosy, or Guinea worm, or polio, or river blindness, or blinding trachoma — it’s impossible not to feel giddy at the gains registered against all of them.
There’s similar progress in empowering women and in reducing illiteracy. Until the 1960s, a majority of humans had always been illiterate; now, 85 percent of adults are literate. And almost nothing makes more difference in a society than being able to read and write.
Michael Elliott, who died last year after leading the One Campaign, which battles poverty, used to say that we are living in an “age of miracles.”
But when the headlines make me sick, I soothe myself with the reflection that in the long history of humanity, this still will likely be the very best year yet.
Remember: The most important thing happening is that today some 18,000 children who in the past would have died of simple diseases will survive, about 300,000 people will gain electricity and a cool 250,000 will graduate from extreme poverty.

God is blessing you.  
 
Pastor Robert Schuller
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Friday, January 20, 2017

Prayer For Peaceful Presidential Innauguration



Dear Lord,
In less than an hour we will have a new President of The United States of America.   Allow this to be a peaceful transfer of power as the new President, Donald Trump takes the oath of office.  Keep the protests civil and may no one be harmed or hurt in any way.  We ask for your comfort and safety for all Americans as we open this new chapter in our nation's history.   We ask that you will create new understanding, tolerance, and peace in our nation and in our world. 
In Jesus Name,  Amen

Pastor Robert A. Schuller

To contact me via email:  Robert@RobertSchullerMinistries.org

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